Thursday, November 6, 2008

President-Elect Obama

Today has been the oddest day. Floating on Cloud Nine, with only intermittant thoughts of the storms ahead. Thinking how beautiful it is to have a President actually Elected, not Selected or snuck in by hook or by crook.

But it was while watching scenes of the global celebration of President-Elect Obama that I finally understood an underlying truth. It was not America the world hated. It was our president and his insane agenda. It is him and his cronies and enablers that are despised worldwide. Whether we deserve it or not, we have been given another chance.

I like the way Paul Krugman summed it up today, short and bittersweet ...

The Monster Years (by Paul Krugman) :

Last night wasn’t just a victory for tolerance; it wasn’t just a mandate for progressive change; it was also, I hope, the end of the monster years.

What I mean by that is that for the past 14 years America’s political life has been largely dominated by, well, monsters. Monsters like Tom DeLay, who suggested that the shootings at Columbine happened because schools teach students the theory of evolution. Monsters like Karl Rove, who declared that liberals wanted to offer “therapy and understanding” to terrorists. Monsters like Dick Cheney, who saw 9/11 as an opportunity to start torturing people.

And in our national discourse, we pretended that these monsters were reasonable, respectable people. To point out that the monsters were, in fact, monsters, was “shrill.”


Four years ago it seemed as if the monsters would dominate American politics for a long time to come. But for now, at least, they’ve been banished to the wilderness.

***** And if you're a Michael Moore fan, like me, click here to read his message today.

8 comments:

Border Explorer said...

There's lots of hope packed into this post, D.K. I also thank you for the M.Moore link--well worth it.

Our basic mode of operation in the U.S. is so unjust as we relate to the world that I can't blame just one person, one administration, one party. We are all part of the problem with our overconsumption and inordinate grabbing of the world's resources. I do hope that we can at least interject a bit more justice into the mix now, but I don't expect to see a revolution.

Fran said...

I expect a revolution, or at least revolutionary changes. Too long we suffered under the torturous
regime, doing things that were unimaginable for this country. They really are monsters, and they really need to be banished.

Funny, Enigma asked for ideas on what should be done in this new administration, and I was able to tick off a fairly long list.
I could come up with an even longer list, if I had more time.
I bet we all could,

Although I partially agree w BE's comment above that there is plenty of blame to go around, I will say that the admin in power sets the tone- in this case, divisive, enemies, us & them- all created a perfect storm of fear & loathing the permeated the mindset of this country.
I hope to never walk through a US airport hearing what level & color, of the terrorism fear chart we are at today.
That is no way to live.

Breakout out of that physical & mental bondage is revolution, than sign me up.

D.K. Raed said...

B. Explorer:
I liked Michael Moore's sentiment, "now ANYTHING is possible"! And also he pointed out how much work there is to do (so much it scares me).

--------
B.E. and FRAN:
I don't blame one single person, so much as a flock of people who steered the ship of state into the shoals for their own nefarious purposes. The fact that we let them, or could not stop them, either way is shameful. Oh sure, there certainly is plenty of blame to spread around, but from where I sit (where else would I sit?), it seems to quite rightly stain one party & one administration far more colorfully than the other. Maybe I already need new glasses.

--------
Fran:
Sad isn't it, that just returning things to normalcy might be considered revolutionary!

Border Explorer said...

I'm really interested in what you two have said here and I hope you don't see me as trying to be argumentative if I continue just a bit. It was, in fact, Michael Moore who first introduced me (in one of his books) to the concept of the two major parties as "Dweedeldum" and "Dwedeldee." Now obviously he took a stand in this election--as did I--because the last 8 years have taught us all that it does make a good deal of difference which party is in power. I hear you on that, Fran! It affects us on so many levels, not the least of which is emotionally. On another level, tho, it feels to me like corporations and banks and power brokers actually call the shots--not so much the elected officials. And both parties seem pretty willing to do their bidding.

Yes, D.K.: how ironic is it that if the Constitution would once again be respected it would feel like a Second Revolution in the United States.

Anon-Paranoid said...

d.k.raed...

I left a comment on your Judas Iscariot LIEberman post.

God Bless.

D.K. Raed said...

B. Explorer, I'm so glad you came back by! Argumentative? Are you kidding? A good discussion with the thoughtful points you bring up is never argumentative!

If I hadn't been so punchy today, I might have more clearly seen your earlier point about our inordinate consumption of the world's resources (which of course you have seen first hand in your good work among our latin neighbors). This MUST contribute to the negative impression the world has of us, how could it not?

Additionally, with your ref to powerful corps, banks & power brokers, you have brought up probably the single most unfair thing in our unfair world, and that is the unfair distribution of wealth. And here is where I think there is a key difference between our two major political parties: there is a belief reflected in the repub party that most poor people of the world deserve to be poor. They point to the pursuit of profit as if it were something noble in and of itself. To me, this mindless accumulation of wealth without concomittant obligation to provide opportunities for all is an abrogation of humanity.

And I would also tentatively point out that this particular bush administration has provided unprecedented opportunity for a select few private corps to amass HUGE profits to the detriment of our entire economy. These corps are overwhelmingly repub-donors, not dem-donors. And of course, donors and donees both enable each other's agendas, so that we've seen elected officials like Tom DeLay pursue agressive tactics intended to completely wipe out "the loyal opposition".

I don't think we've ever seen anything like the private blackwater armies or cost-plus military contracts handed out to halliburton, and these corps are only the ones visible to us. I hate to think how much has been hidden in this administration's headlong drive to rape the heart of america & hand it bleeding & barely beating to those that feed on such macabre delicacies far beyond the point of mere satiation.

Do I think the dems are blameless or will suddenly find enough spine to reverse this gravy train for the rich? No. But I do hope that with the dems in power, and with enough public awareness, we can rein it in.

OK, I know I kind of ran off on a tangent here, but I wanted you to know, dear Border Explorer, that your thoughts are always welcome -- they inspire or should inspire much introspective analysis. Sometimes we all need a kick in the butt to get our brains going!

Border Explorer said...

D.K., I've been off-line for a couple days. Just wanted to tell you that your comment (above) was brilliant. Thank you!

D.K. Raed said...

hey B.E. I knew you'd eventually see it! I enjoy trying to think something through (emphasis on "trying"), so don't ever feel like you can't say what's on your mind here, PLEASE! I think we all need less of an echo-chamber and more real dialogue, less yes-men&women, and more informative discussion. We don't have to agree on everything, why should we, it'd be so boring that way. Plus I don't really think we disagreed, just came at the same point from different angles.